Tag Archives: Trinidad and Tobago

Indian Arrival Day Commemorative Magazine 2017

Historical novels on indentureship in the Caribbean

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Centre (ICC) is proud to announce the publication of its latest magazine commemorating Indian Heritage Month (May 2017) in Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean). The theme of the magazine which marks the arrival of East Indians/South Asians from India to the Caribbean during indentureship (1838-1917) is “Historical novels on indentureship in the Caribbean.”

A historical novel is a detailed story which has been set in the past. It is a blend of history and fiction which sometimes serve to popularise history itself. Historical novels belong to the literary genre of historical fiction which includes other narrative forms such as plays,
poems, songs, movies and comics.

Most people enjoy reading historical novels more than studying history books because they gain insight into the hopes, dreams, fears, failures and triumphs of characters (e.g. kings, governors, rebels, etc.). Readers also catch a rare and privileged opportunity to peep into the private lives, minds and thoughts of historical figures through their humanisation. They may also read how historical novelists challenge the “grand narratives” of conventional historiographies.

Thirteen (13) novels on indentureship are highlighted in this edition of the magazine.

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Divali festival souvenir magazine 2016

Chatti and Barahe – 6th and 12th day Hindu childbirth ceremonies

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Centre Co. Ltd. (ICC) wishes to announce the publication of its latest souvenir magazine – Divali 2016, Trinidad and Tobago. The theme of this edition of its annual magazine is “Chatti and Barahe – 6th and 12th day Hindu childbirth ceremonies.”

Among all ethnic groups in Trinidad and Tobago, Hindus perform the most intricate childbirth ceremony. Some families prefer to observe the birth celebration on the twelfth day, in which case it is known as a barahe and is of greater magnitude than the sixth-day celebration. This is one of the rare Hindu religious ceremonies in which a female [masseuse] officiates.

The masseuse performs rituals such as gently tossing the baby into the air, dragging the new-born in a scoop (“soop”), applying kajal [lamp mascara] to the baby’s eyes, and dotting her forehead [tika] to protect the new-born from being infected by najar [evil eye]. For several days, the traditional masseuse massages the baby and the new mother, and she also attends to the maternal abdominal band. On the evening of the celebration, guests arrive and are served food and drinks. The evening begins a long night of noisy rejoicing when chutney and sohar songs are rendered in Hindi and English. The participation of relatives from both sides of the family emphasises the importance of birth in continuing family lines and cementing family bonds.

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Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2016

Hindu and Indian-formatted music radio stations in Trinidad and Tobago.

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Centre Co Ltd (ICC) is proud to announce the publication of its latest magazine commemorating Indian Heritage Month (May 2016) in Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean). The theme of the magazine which marks the arrival of East Indians/South Asians from India to Trinidad (1845-1917) is “Hindu and Indian-formatted music radio stations in Trinidad and Tobago.”

The theme of this year’s edition of our magazine is “Hindu and Indian-formatted music radio stations in Trinidad and Tobago.” There are 39 FM radio stations in Trinidad and Tobago servicing the diverse needs of the multi-religious, multi-ethnic, multi-racial society. Nine of them are Hindu and Indian-formatted music radio stations: Jaagriti 102.7 FM, The People’s Station 90.5 FM, Taj 82.3 FM, Hot Like Pepper U97.5 FM, Win Radio 101.1 FM, Heritage Radio 101.7 FM, The First…The Finest 103 FM, Sangeet 106.1 FM, and Aakash Vani 106.5 FM.

The very first sound of Indian music on radio was aired in 1947 when Radio Trinidad – the country’s first radio station – was launched. The station broadcasted a one-hour program, Indian Talent on Parade, hosted by Kamal Mohammed. While ground-breaking, the limited time for the Indian music on air would remain for over 40 years. Longer Indian programmes were not considered economically feasible until 1993 when103 FM was launched. 103FM created a revolution. It proved that there was a need for radio stations dedicated to Hindu and Indian religious and cultural programmes.

May-June 2016
11 x 8 ½ inches. Glossy pages and cover.
ISSN 1683-4143
40 pages with advertisements and articles.

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Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2015

Mastana Bahar: the longest running (45 years) local TV talent show in Trinidad and Tobago

The theme of this year’s edition of our magazine is “Mastana Bahar.” This magazine captures the history and evolution of Mastana Bahar [Joyful Season] which is unquestionably the longest running, locally-produced TV talent show in Trinidad and Tobago, and perhaps even in the Caribbean. It is the longest running talent show when compared to competitive and non-competitive, Indian and non-Indian cultural TV programmes. Its closest competitor is Scouting for Talent which ran for 30 years (1963 – 1993) hosted regularly by Holly Betaudier. Mastana was first produced by Sham Mohammed on July 4, 1970 on Trinidad and Tobago Television (TTT).

Renowned US musicologist Peter Manuel (2000) stated that “Mastana Bahar has evolved into an institution in Trinidadian culture.” And in her book entitled Music in Latin America and the Caribbean (2004), Malena Kuss wrote that since the 1970s, the local talent TV show has been a central feature of local cultural life.

At present, Mastana is aired on GISL TV 4 on Saturdays from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Sundays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and Thursdays from 9:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. It is also broadcasted on IETV Channel 1 on Sundays from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.


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