Category Archives: Indian Arrival Day Magazine

Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2014

Finding family roots in ancestral India

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Centre (ICC) is proud to announce the publication of its latest magazine commemorating Indian Heritage Month (May 2014) in Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean). The theme of the magazine which marks the arrival of East Indians/South Asians from India to Trinidad during indentureship (1845-1917) is “Finding family roots in ancestral India.”

This edition of the magazine captures the experiences of six persons of Indian origin from the Caribbean who were successful in finding their distant relatives in ancestral India. Ramesh Ramcharan, Ramnarace Dwarika, Dev Ramoutar, Veda Marimuthu, Shamshu Deen and Vishnu Bisram share their sentimental experiences through spontaneous words and selected photographs. In their narratives, they paint a moving picture, filled with amazing discoveries and extraordinary kindness. These five men and one woman went to India separately and at different times (1998, 2001, 2003, 2007 and 2012). Their spell-binding accounts engage readers in such a way that they are made to feel part of the returnees’ personal experiences. Their stories allow readers to connect – in a very real way – to a past and a place that some people could only have imagined when listening to the stories of their grandparents. These real-life narratives are invaluable sources of information, and the accounts presented in the magazine cannot be found collectively in any book or on the internet. They contribute a unique and precious aspect to the historiography on indentureship.


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Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2013

Major Indian-inspired Festivals of Trinidad and Tobago

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Centre Co Ltd (ICC) is proud to announce the publication of its latest magazine commemorating Indian Heritage Month (May 2013) in Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean). The theme of the magazine which marks the arrival of East Indians/South Asians from India to Trinidad (1845-1917) is “Indian-inspired Festivals of Trinidad and Tobago.”

Few countries in the world offer as many multi-cultural festivals all year round as Trinidad and Tobago. The range of festivals is reflective of the diversity of the people in the multi-ethnic society who can trace their roots to Africa, India, Asia, Europe and the Middle East. Although East Indians form half of the population of the twin-island republic of 1.3 million people, not many visitors witness the variety and abundance of their colourful festivals. Indian-inspired festivals are of Hindu, Muslim and Christian origin, and include Divali, Eid-ul-Fitr and Soopari Mai. The first two festivals are observed as national holidays in addition to Indian Arrival Day. Other Indian-based festivals include Ram Leela, Phagwa, Shiv Raatri, Ganga Dhaaraa, Kartik, Janam-ashtimi, Ganesh Utsav, Ratha Yatra, and Hosay. All of these festivals have been adapted to suit the modern times and local environment. These Indian-inspired festivals form an integral part of the multi-ethnic society and add colour, enthusiasm, harmony and character to Trinidad and Tobago.


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Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2012

Portraits of Chutney Singers in Trinidad and Tobago.

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Centre Co Ltd (ICC) is proud to announce the publication of its latest magazine commemorating Indian Heritage Month (May 2011) in Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean). The theme of the magazine which marks the early arrival of East Indians/South Asians from India to Trinidad (1845-1917) is “Portraits of Chutney Singers in Trinidad and Tobago.”

Chutney has become the defining idiom through which people of East Indian descent have made their musical mark in the Caribbean. Never before have chutney artistes, chutney concerts and chutney competitions pushed for airplay and space on the public stage as in Carnival 2012 in multi-ethnic Trinidad and Tobago. In recent years, Indians have contributed to changing the construction of “the national festival” to the extent that Carnival has now to be re-defined to include Chutney Monarch, Chutney Brass, Chutney Soca, Chutney Calypso, Chutney Glow, and Chutney Mardi Gras. Events that are chutney-based have allowed Indians to gain a sense of inclusion in this grand “national” festival, although on the periphery of the main city centre. What these cultural incursions mean is that chutney has allowed Indians to actively participate in Carnival without losing their (sense of) ethnic identity


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Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2011

The Indian Diaspora in Belize, Guadeloupe & Suriname

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Centre Co Ltd (ICC) is proud to announce the publication of its latest magazine commemorating Indian Heritage Month (May 2011) in Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean). The theme of the magazine which marks the early arrival of East Indians/South Asians from India to Trinidad (1845-1917) is “The Indian Diaspora in Belize, Guadeloupe & Suriname.”

Belize is located in Central America, Guadeloupe in the Northern Caribbean and Surname in South America. Belize is English-speaking, Guadeloupe is French-speaking and Suriname is largely Dutch-speaking. Yet, all three countries belong to the Caribbean and have descendants of East Indian indentured immigrant labourers domiciled in them.

Indians in Belize comprise four percent (7,000 persons) of the population, Guadeloupe, eight percent (30,000), and Suriname, 37 percent (172,200). The Indians in Belize have lost almost all of their traditional culture, Guadeloupe still maintains some, while Suriname, has managed to preserve a rich Indian cultural heritage. If there is one country in the Western World that can be labelled “Little India,” it is Suriname. Interestingly, Belize and Guadeloupe are longing to re-discover and re-claim their Indian history, heritage and culture. Both countries are looking towards Trinidad for inspiration, interaction, support and sustenance.


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Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2010

Glimpses of indentureship: Traditional culture and agriculture in Kernahan Village in Nariva.

The theme of this year’s edition of the magazine is “Glimpses of indentureship: Traditional culture and agriculture in Kernahan Village in Nariva.” Kernahan is located off the Manzanilla Road near Mayaro. It is estimated that there are approximately 60 households in the isolated village that is almost exclusively populated by people of East Indian descent. The villagers were predominantly Hindus, but the majority of them have converted to the Pentecostal faith. There are now two churches and one Hindu-based Sai Baba Centre. Most of the inhabitants catch conch and cascadura and cultivate short-term cash crops such as watermelons for their livelihood. While there is a community centre and a kindergarten, the area is not served by a public school. Electricity was introduced in 2000, but the area is yet to be served with pipe borne-water. The quality of life and living conditions have improved considerably in Kernahan since the first settlers came mainly from Penal in the 1960s.

June 2010. 11 x 8½ inches. ISSN 1683-4143
Glossy  pages and cover.
72 pages with advertisements and articles.

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Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2009

A pictorial survey of books on indentureship in the Caribbean

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council (ICC) is proud to announce the publication of its latest magazine commemorating Indian Heritage Month (May 2009) in Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean). The theme of the magazine which marks the arrival of East Indians/South Asians from India to Trinidad during indentureship (1845-1917) is “A pictorial survey of books on indentureship in the Caribbean.”

This glossy magazine in full colour highlights the first book on the subject that was written by Joseph Beaumont and published in 1871. It is entitled The New Slavery: An Account of the Indian and Chinese Immigrants in British Guiana. About 80 years later, the second non-fiction book was written by Dwarka Nath and published in 1950, entitled A History of Indians in British Guiana. Since then about 83 books have been published on the subject, mainly by Indians in the Diaspora, some of them being women. Eight of these are works of fiction.


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Indian Arrival Day commemorative magazine 2008

Heritage Tourism: Indian heritage and sacred sites in Trinidad

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council (ICC) is proud to announce the publication of its latest magazine commemorating Indian Heritage Month (May 2008) in Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean). The theme of the magazine which marks the arrival of East Indians/South Asians from India to Trinidad during indentureship (1845-1917) is “Heritage Tourism: Indian heritage and sacred sites in Trinidad.”

This glossy magazine in full colour highlights significant places, built structures and land formations that Indians consider to be particularly historical or sacred to them in multi-ethnic Trinidad. These sites include three temples, three secular buildings, a mosque, a church, a cave, a rock, a volcano, a river, a beach, a massacre site, a cremation ground, and Nelson Island. Though these designated sites and architectural monuments bear special meaning to Indians, they exhibit outstanding values that are universal to all mankind. These sites have become popular destinations to local visitors and can be marketed to attract tourists.


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