Category Archives: Divali Magazine

Divali festival souvenir magazine 2009

Paintings on Hinduism in Trinidad and Tobago

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council (ICC) wishes to announce the publication of it’s latest Divali magazine in 2009. The theme of this edition of its annual souvenir magazine is “Paintings on Hinduism in Trinidad and Tobago.”

The magazine represents a collection of 34 pieces by aspiring artists, students and professionals in the country. Fifty percent (50%) of the paintings were done by children and 50% by adults. Seventy-six percent (76%) of the artists appear to be Indians and 24% seem to be non-Indians, based on an analysis of their surnames. Fifty-three percent (53%) bear Hindi surnames, 24% carry English/Other surnames, and 23% of them have Arabic last names.

The collection of paintings in magazine format can mirror a display of visual art images in a public gallery exhibition. However, a magazine carries the advantage of allowing one to view the images at one’s own private place, time and convenience. Indeed, it brings the conventional city art gallery – frequented by the elite in society – to the private living room of the common folk. Like a photographic album, a magazine can be kept as a collector’s item for future reference, study, review and enjoyment. This magazine has the added value of including an art critique of each painting, which makes it relevant to any discourse on contemporary culture and ethnic identity. The “reading” of each painting highlights the visual creativity of our local artists and the appreciation of Hindu/Indian aesthetics in the Caribbean.


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Divali festival souvenir magazine 2008

Education in Hindu Schools in Trinidad and Tobago

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council (ICC) wishes to announce the publication of its latest Divali magazine in 2008. The theme of this edition of its annual souvenir magazine is “Education in Hindu Schools in Trinidad and Tobago.”

comprising of 54 Government-assisted Hindu primary schools. These Hindu schools consist of 43 schools managed by the Sanatan Dharma Maha Sabha (SDMS), nine by the Arya Pratinidhi Sabha (APS/Vedic), and two by the Kabir Panth Association (KPA). There are also eight Hindu Secondary Schools in the country administered by the SDMS, SWAHA and Chinmaya Mission. There are also scores of Hindu Early Childhood Care and Education Centers.

Today, these schools are a source of pride to Hindus. The results of the SEA examination in 2008 reveal that among denominational institutions, Hindu schools performed the second best after Muslim schools. They also attained the same level of excellence as private primary schools. Hindu schools comprise just 10% of all primary schools in the country, but secured 22% of the schools that made it to the top 100 places in the SEA examination.

Once again, Lakshmi Girls’ Hindu College occupied pride of place among prestigious secondary schools in Trinidad. It secured an impressive 15 National Scholarships in the 2008 CAPE/GCE A’ Level Examinations. Lakshmi Girls’ is now ranked third in performance in A’ Levels among all seven-year schools in North Trinidad. Shiva Boys’ Hindu College in Penal made history by winning two National (Open) Scholarships. The Maha Sabha-managed Hindu college won these awards for the first time with its first batch of A’ Level graduates.


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Divali festival souvenir magazine 2007

Steps of the Hindu Marriage Ceremony

Marriage is one of the most-important of the sixteen maro [sacraments] in the life of a Hindu. It is no wonder, therefore, that so many relatives, friends and well-wishers are invited to witness the ceremony. Deities are also invited to witness and bless the marriage. They are invoked by the presiding pandits through the chanting of verses in Sanskrit from the ancient Vedas. The marriage does not only establish a bond between two individuals but also between two families. It is an elaborate and lavish affair with numerous rites and rituals lasting three to four days. The main ceremony takes place at the bride’s place under a maro or maro [canopy] beautifully decorated with electric bulbs, colourful fabrics and flower petals. Each step has its own function and significance.

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Divali festival souvenir magazine 2006

The Splendour of Divali: Highlights of the Festival

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council (ICC) wishes to announce the publication of its latest magazine – Divali 2006, Trinidad and Tobago. The theme of this edition of its annual souvenir magazine is “The Splendour of Divali: Highlights of the Festival.”

Trinidad and Tobago, the famed island of Carnival, is the same country that gives the world its unique brand of Divali. Where else would non-Hindus and non-Indians actively take part in lighting over ten million deyas on an auspicious night? It is perhaps only in Trinidad that one can find split bamboo tubes transformed into magnificent works of art on which the deyas are placed. Strings of twinkling lights – clear and coloured – are also strung high on buildings, trees, and even across streets. Divali provides a perfect forum for showcasing the talent of both foreign and local performers in the field of Indian song, music, dance and drama. Divali also boasts of Ram Leela which is perhaps the oldest living form of free outdoor folk theatre in the Caribbean. The hub of all Divali celebrations in the island is the Divali Nagar in central Trinidad. The grand display of fireworks in the air at the Nagar is complemented by the thunder of bamboo cannons, the explosions of firecrackers, and the sparkle of “star-lights” in villages across the country.

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Divali festival souvenir magazine 2005

Temples and Tourism in Trinidad and Tobago

Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council (ICC) wishes to announce the publication of its latest souvenir magazine – Divali 2005, Trinidad and Tobago. The theme of this edition of its annual magazine is “Temples and Tourism in Trinidad and Tobago.”

The concept of spiritual tourism has become the new buzzword in the travel-and-tours circuit all over the world. This brand of tourism has remained untapped so far in the southern Caribbean, but has been exploited in the U.K. by groups like North Yorkshire Tourism Initiative. Spiritual tourism has the greatest potential for attracting foreign visitors outside of the busy Carnival season. One tourist destination can be the temple in Waterloo which has a gigantic Hanuman murti [statue] towering 85 feet (25 metres) high. In the same area is the monumental Temple-in-the-Sea, known world-wide for its exceptional history, design and location. The target market for this brand of tourism would be Hindus and Indians in the United States. They comprise a total of over two million people, and are reported to be the fastest-growing and wealthiest ethnic community in that country.


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Divali festival souvenir magazine 2004

Caribbean Indian Fashion.

The Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council (ICC) wishes to announce the publication of its latest souvenir magazine – Divali 2004, Trinidad and Tobago. The theme of this edition of its annual magazine is “Caribbean Indian Fashion.”

This magazine carries articles on, and photographs of, local designs of clothes, jewellery and accessories that have become an undiluted and unbroken tradition from India to the Caribbean for over 150 years. As a matter of fact, while other influences have made inroads into language, food, music and dance, fashion remains one cultural expression which consumers insist must be authentic in style, and direct from India. But there are scores of local artistes who merge East and West, tradition and modern, and India and the Caribbean in fabrics that catch the imagination.

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Divali festival souvenir magazine 2003

Food culture and (un)healthy eating.

The Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council (ICC) wishes to announce the publication of its souvenir magazine – Divali October 2003 in Trinidad and Tobago. The theme of this edition of our annual magazine is “Food culture and (un)healthy eating.”

The Ministry of Health statistics show that one of the main causes of death in Trinidad and Tobago is cardiovascular disease. Moreover, statistics from Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) reveal that this country ranks fifth in the world per capita in the case of diabetes. It must be recognized that certain aspects of our cultural dietary tradition may in fact be dangerous to our health. Divali, with its lavish feasts of sweets and fatty foods, is an appropriate time to bring greater awareness about the importance of a healthy diet in preventing heart diseases and diabetes.

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